Posts tagged Photovoice

Video: Latino Youth Struggle toward Healthier Lifestyles; Hope to Inspire Change

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photovoiceCheck out this neat video about how the National Council of La Raza (NCLR) empowered Latino youth in Chicago and San Antonio to use the Photovoice technique to share their neighborhood’s assets and the barriers they face to living a healthy and active lifestyle.

Armed with disposable cameras, the youth photographed their surroundings, good and bad.

The photos showcased limited access to nutritious foods, unsafe playgrounds, and a general lack of awareness about healthy eating habits.

NCLR officials hope the video, which showcases the uphill struggle many Latino kids face to living a healthy lifestyle, can inspire community change.

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A New Wave of Salud Heroes for Healthy Change

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SAE-NCoverHow can…

…you be a Salud Hero? (Page 1)

…researchers give Latina teens a (photo) voice to impact their community? (Page 3)

…Latino bodegas get healthier? (Page 5)

Find out in the latest Salud America! E-newsletter.

Salud America! The RWJF Research Network to Prevent Obesity Among Latino Children is a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The program aims to unite and increase the number of Latino stakeholders engaged in community change and research on environmental and policy solutions to the epidemic. The network is directed by the Institute for Health Promotion Research at The UT Health Science Center at San Antonio.

Don’t forget to share your stories at our new Salud America! Growing Healthy Change website. We can help you get a national audience for your work!

Giving Latina Teens a (Photo) Voice to Impact the Community

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Latina teens will take photos of their environment to show policymakers.

Latina teens will take photos of their environment to show policymakers.

Two researchers have received $250,000 to expand their work to empower Latina teens in New Britain, Conn., to photograph areas for improvement in their community and use the results to sway policymakers.

The researchers, Drs. Robert Dudley and Jayme Hannay of the Community Health Center, Inc., are former grantees of Salud America!, a Latino childhood obesity research network funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and based at the Institute for Health Promotion Research at The UT Health Science Center at San Antonio.

For Salud America!, Dudley and Hannay conducted a mid-course evaluation of their Healthy Tomorrows for Teens (HTT) obesity prevention and leadership training program.

They found that Photovoice, a photographic technique that empowers community members to identify a neighborhood’s strengths and weaknesses, can be used to teach Latina teens about leadership, community engagement, and the importance of leading healthy lifestyles.

Now, thanks to the new five-year grant (2013-2018) from the Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children Program and through a partnership with the YWCA, six teen leaders and a facilitator will again use Photovoice to identify the positives and negatives in the environment.

Their work will serve to inform policymakers and key stakeholders during the planning process of a new YWCA teen center, called the House of Teens (HOT). The HOT will serve as both a center for primary care services and as hub to provide leadership and advocacy training to teens.

Dudley and Hannay say this ongoing use of Photovoice is helping develop a large network of empowered Latina teens.

“A program like Photovoice, offered multiple times and with different partners in a defined community like New Britain, eventually benefits from a natural affinity group or social network to sustain itself,” Hannay said.

Hannay said the financial support, training, and Photovoice research findings that Salud America! published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, were all critical for leveraging the new grant. One of the new student leaders, Anashlie Lopez, even is the cousin of a teen leader, Rose Burgos, who presented her Photovoice findings to the Common Council of New Britain as part of the Salud America! project.

Study: ‘Photovoice’ Empowers Latino Youth to Spark Health Policy Change

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Editor’s Note: This is a 20-part series featuring new research briefs on Latino childhood obesity, nutrition, physical activity and more by the 20 grantees of Salud America! Part 11 is Dr. Robert Dudley. Find all briefs here.

Dr. Robert Dudley

Dr. Robert Dudley
“Healthy Tomorrows for Latina Teens”

In his Salud America! pilot research project, Dr. Robert Dudley of Community Health Center, Inc., evaluated Health Tomorrows for Latina Teens, a five-year, federally-funded obesity prevention and advocacy training program for adolescent girls in New Britain, Conn.

To identify factors that promote or prevent physical activity among Latina teens, Dr. Dudley’s team taught girls Photovoice—a research method that puts cameras in people’s hands to assess community problems and assets, and then connects them to policymakers to pursue change.

Key preliminary findings include:

  • barriers prevent Latina teen activity;
  • photovoice can address these barriers; and
  • photovoice can expedite policy change by facilitating direct, informal dialogue between policymakers and Latino youth.

The project spurred the local school district to add a P.E. credit recovery program. Two of the project’s participating teen girls also made a stirring presentation to their city council asking to clean and reopen two closed pools at local parks to add more activity options in town (see video below).

Results indicate that Photovoice is a viable, low-cost means of empowering Latina teens to develop leadership and advocacy skills. Further, the program helps to generate community support for increased physical activity.

Read more here.

Salud America! is an RWJF national program directed by the Institute for Health Promotion Research at The UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, the team behind SaludToday.

Video: Latina Teens Advocate for Community Change

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Rosemarie Burgos and Melanie Benitez were a bit nervous.

The two teens—on a night when their friends might be home watching TV—were about to stand before the Common Council of New Britain, Conn., and argue that the city should plan to re-open pools to boost local physical activity options.

But they came prepared.

Months before that Sept. 8 city meeting, Benitez, Burgos and other Latina teens joined a pilot project led by the Community Health Center and funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) through Salud America! The RWJF Research Network to Prevent Obesity Among Latino Children.

As part of the project, the girls took photos of parks and the closed pools littered with trash and graffiti, interviewed kids, parents and city officials on the need for water-related exercise options, and got 100 signatures on a petition to re-open pools.

Then, at the meeting, Burgos and Benitez made their pitch.

How did it go? Read the full story here or watch the girls’ presentation here or below:

Girl Scouts’ Photos Helping Assess Barriers to Fitness in San Antonio

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Girl-Scouts-Logo-710841Girl Scouts, parents and community members gathered in San Antonio recently to review the girls’ photos of barriers to physical activity, and discuss ways to overcome barriers and encourage activity.

Below are some of the girls’ with their photos.

The girls’ photo presentations and the information gathered at the recent community retreat will be used by researchers at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio as part of a broader effort to get young girls, particularly young Hispanic girls, moving.

The project is led by two researchers from the Institute for Health Promotion Research at the Health Science Center, Deborah M. Parra-Medina and Laura Esparza. Parra-Medina, a professor of epidemiology and biostatistics, studies health disparities in underserved communities and works to create behavioral interventions.

Read more about the effort here.

Scouts 2

Scouts1

Rave Reviews for Booklet of Minority Teens’ Anti-Smoking Photos

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Tobacco_PhotoBk_4-26-10Rave reviews are coming in for a visually stunning booklet featuring minority teens’ anti-smoking photos from a project for which eight San Antonio high-school students took photos and wrote captions to visually describe tobacco problems in their neighborhoods to policy-makers.

“This is a wonderful example of how to invigorate public health messaging and make it ‘sing’ within one of your priority populations. The involvement of youth in the planning and execution of the project in a meaningful way is something that should be replicated throughout other areas of the State. Congratulations to…all the ‘gang’ at the UT Health Science Center for working with the San Antonio Tobacco Prevention and Control Coalition to carry it out!” said Gail Sneden, a project director of Applied Research Tobacco Prevention and Control in the Department of Kinesiology and Health Education at the University of Texas at Austin.

The project, sponsored by the San Antonio Tobacco Prevention and Control Coalition, paired tobacco prevention researchers at the Institute for Health Promotion Research at The UT Heath Science Center at San Antonio, the team behind SaludToday, with students in a youth program of the Family Service Association.

See the students’ photos and more about the project here.

Teens’ Photos Tell Story of Tobacco Problems in Minority Neighborhoods

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VictorSAN ANTONIO—Memorial High School student Victor Hernandez (at right) points to his photograph of a smoked cigarette butt lodged in the crack of a sidewalk.

The photo caption starts: “Cigarettes get between everything.”

“People might dream to be a doctor, lawyer – then cigarettes get introduced,” Victor said of the photo’s meaning. “With every cigarette it gets harder and harder to quit, you get closer to death. Your original dream goes away.”

Victor is one of eight students from Edgewood Independent School District’s Kennedy and Memorial high schools who recently partook in a “Photovoice Smoke-Free” project, where students took photos and wrote captions to visually describe the problem of tobacco to policy-makers. Researchers from the Institute for Health Promotion Research at The UT Health Science Center, the team behind SaludToday, were involved in the project.

See a commemorative book about the students and their photos here.

S.A. Teens Photograph Their Neighborhoods to Illustrate Tobacco Problems

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VictorSAN ANTONIO—Memorial High School student Victor Hernandez (at right) points to his photograph of a smoked cigarette butt lodged in the crack of a sidewalk.

The photo caption starts: “Cigarettes get between everything.”

“People might dream to be a doctor, lawyer – then cigarettes get introduced,” Victor said of the photo’s meaning. “With every cigarette it gets harder and harder to quit, you get closer to death. Your original dream goes away.”

Victor is one of eight students from Edgewood Independent School District’s Kennedy and Memorial high schools who recently partook in a “Photovoice Smoke-Free” project, where students took photos and wrote captions to visually describe the problem of tobacco to policy- and decision-makers.

Read more about the students and their photos here or in the latest E-newsletter from the Institute for Health Promotion Research at the UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, the team behind Salud Today.

San Antonio Students Help Put Spotlight on Tobacco Cessation

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Eight San Antonio high-school students, including several Latinos, will be recognized on Jan. 22, 2010, for their outstanding work in a Photovoice project that highlights youth tobacco concerns in the community.

SATPCC logo-colorFor the project, students from Kennedy and Memorial high schools in San Antonio identified important issues related to tobacco through group discussions and Photovoice, which blends a grassroots approach to photography and social action, to empower the students to take social action within their community. Students created presentations using their photos and captions.

An award ceremony for the students starts at 6:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 22, 2010, at the Casa de Mexico International Building at the Alameda Koehler Auditorium in San Antonio.

The public is invited to this free event.

The ceremony is sponsored by the San Antonio Tobacco Prevention and Control Coalition, a consortium of groups dedicated to a smoke-free San Antonio. The Institute for Health Promotion Research (IHPR) at the UT Health Science Center in San Antonio, the team behind SaludToday, is a member and helped organize the Photovoice project.

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