Posts tagged bilingual

New Spanish Website Aims to Mobilize Mothers to Take Action on Women’s Issues

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spanish_graphicCheck out the new MamásConPoder website for Spanish-speaking and bilingual members of MomsRising, a nonprofit advocacy group that educates the public and mobilizes grassroots action for critical women’s issues.

MomsRising is an on-the-ground and online multicultural organization of more than a million members and more than 100 aligned organizations working to increase family economic security, to end discrimination against women and mothers, and to build a nation where both businesses and families can thrive.

MomsRising is also a new media outlet with more than 1,000 bloggers and a combined estimated blogging and social media readership reach to over 3 million people.

Read more about the new MamásConPoder campaign in this blog post.

If you sign up with the new website in the next two weeks, your name will be entered to win one of two giveaways worth more than $100 each, such as handbags, earrings, bracelets to benefit various nonprofits in Latin America.

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New Program to Bring Patient Navigators, Breast Cancer Screening and Education to South Texas Women

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Sandra Costilla, a patient navigator at the Institute for Health Promotion Research (right), accepted the $100,000 check for the new program from the Avon Foundation at its 12th Annual Walk for Breast Cancer. Costilla said: “Thank you Avon walkers and crew! Your donations will help support our Navegando Salud navigator program offering one-on-one counseling to 250 women in one of the highest risk zip codes in southern Texas, and will provide screening for thousands of women to get them into treatment faster. On behalf of all of those women, thank you.”

Minority women have low breast cancer screening rates.

Even if they are screened, they delay confirmatory diagnosis and treatment because of costs, cultural and language issues, competing responsibilities, and more.

That’s why Dr. Amelie G. Ramirez, professor and director of the Institute for Health Promotion Research (IHPR) at the UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, is offering the Navegando Salud patient navigator program, which trains bilingual, bicultural community health workers to offer breast cancer screenings, education and other services to women in South Texas.

Navegando Salud just received a one-year, $100,000 grant from the Avon Foundation.

The grant was among 10 announced at the 12th Annual Avon Walk for Breast Cancer in Houston on April 13, 2014.

“We’re honored to receive this grant, which will help us go a long way in generating the best breast care possible for women and their families,” said Ramirez, the Dielmann Chair in Health Disparities Research & Community Outreach and the Max and Minnie Tomerlin Voelcker Endowed Chair in Cancer Health Care Disparities at the Health Science Center.

Patient navigation has proven to remove barriers to screening, promote timely diagnosis and treatment, and improve outcomes for medically underserved cancer patients, Ramirez said.

Navegando Salud aims to:

  • remove barriers to access to timely, high-quality breast cancer care;
  • facilitate seamless patient-centered, multi-disciplinary care delivery;
  • educate patients on the importance of early detection and treatment adherence; and
  • provide community outreach and education in high-need areas to promote cancer screening and healthy behaviors to reduce women’s breast cancer risk.

“Our navigators, Sandra Costilla and Armida Flores, will tailor their services to each patient’s needs to improve patients’ quality of life and satisfaction with the breast health care received during their cancer journey,” Ramirez said.

In addition to Navegando Salud, the Avon Foundation funded nine other projects across Texas.

Find out about all 10 grants here.

“Every grant moves us closer toward our goal of a world without breast cancer,” said Eloise Caggiano, a breast cancer survivor and program director of the Avon Walk for Breast Cancer.

Why Do Latinos Struggle with Asthma?

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asthma kid-docLatinos are at high risk for asthma because prevalence, illness and deaths are strongly correlated with urban air quality, indoor allergens, lack of patient education and inadequate medical care, according to an American Lung Association report.

Both asthma and allergies are caused by the body’s immune response to environmental triggers, such that some allergens can also trigger asthma, according to Kaiser Permanente.

Other irritants can trigger asthma, too, such as the flu.

So what can Latinos do?

To make an action plan, visit Kaiser Permanente’s bilingual website.

You can also check out Spanish-language resources from the American Lung Association:

  • Breathe Well, Live Well is an adult asthma self-management education program led by an American Lung Association-trained facilitator that is offered in a small group setting, with materials in Spanish.
  • The American Lung Association’s Open Airways For Schools is a school-based curriculum available in Spanish that educates and empowers children through a fun and interactive approach to asthma self-management. It teaches children with asthma ages 8-11 how to detect the warning signs of asthma, avoid their triggers and make decisions about their health.
  • The Lung HelpLine, 1-800-LUNG-USA, offers one-on-one support from Spanish-speaking registered nurses and respiratory therapists.

Go here for more.

New Bilingual App Helps Heart Attack Patients

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CathMapsLatinos face higher rates of heart disease than other populations because of high blood pressure, obesity and diabetes, the American Heart Association reports.

There’s a new free app to give peace of mind for those who have recovered from a heart attack.

The CathMaps+ app has a GPS locator to find the nearest cath lab—an exam room with diagnostic imaging equipment to see the heart’s arteries and chambers and treat abnormalities—anywhere in the world and stores the user’s emergency medical records for immediate access, offering critical tools needed in an emergency incident.

“People who have had a heart attack are at significant risk of a repeat cardiac event in the future. If this happens, calling an ambulance and rushing to the nearest hospital with a cath lab is crucial. The nearest hospital is often not the same as the one the patient previously visited, and it is highly unlikely that the medical records will be on hand,” according to the CathMaps+ website.

The app in available in English and Spanish on iOS and Android devices.

Video: The Benefits of Being Bilingual

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Can speaking more than one language make you smarter in other ways?

Check out this video from ABC News that explores the benefits of speaking both Spanish and English in a fun, lighthearted way.

New Website: HealthyChildren.org en Español

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Family in living room with laptop smilingA new website, HealthyChildren.org en Español, launched this week with nearly 2,000 translated articles on more than 300 children’s health topics.

The site has features such as:

The site, from the American Academy of Pediatrics, aims to be a resource for pediatric health and safety information in Spanish.

Resource: Bilingual Information on Heart Health

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Million HeartsTo help Latinos from suffering from heart disease, stroke, and other cardiovascular diseases, the Million Hearts program has released some new Spanish-language resources to get this group information and tools needed to improve their heart health.

Resources include:

  • Million Hearts website (en Español)
  • Four Steps for Heart Health
  • Community Health Workers Fact Sheet
  • How to Control Your Hypertension by Learning to Control Your Sodium Intake: A Fotonovela
  • How to Control Your Hypertension by Learning to Control Your Sodium Intake: Promotora Guide

Million Hearts is a national initiative that was launched by the Department of Health and Human Services in September 2011 to prevent one million heart attacks and strokes over five years.

The group asks you to share your heart health stories, like this Latino man below, on Facebook or Twitter (@MillionHeartsUS).

VIDEOS: ‘No Excuses’ for Not Getting Colorectal Cancer Screening

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What’s your excuse?

A new bilingual public service announcement (PSA) from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) addresses common excuses and misconceptions that lead people to delay or avoid getting screened for colorectal cancer.

The PSA features men and women who voice their personal reasons for not being screened, while an off-camera announcer responds by providing facts about colorectal cancer screening and its importance. Adults ages 50-59, Hispanics, and persons with lower income, less than a high school education, and without health insurance were least likely to have been screened for colorectal cancer, according to CDC statistics.

Watch in English:

Watch in Spanish:

Latina Moms and Moms-to-Be, Get Free Health Tips by Text

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text4babyCheck out Text4baby, a free bilingual mobile information service that provides pregnant women and new moms with information to help them care for their health and give their babies the best possible start in life.

Sign up for the service by texting BABY (or BEBE for Spanish) to 511411.

Once enrolled, three free SMS messages are sent each week, timed to either a woman’s due date or baby’s date of birth.

Text4baby has proven beneficial effects, according to a recent study of 122 women by the National Latino Research Center at California State University, San Marcos, and the University of California, San Diego:

  • 64% reported text4baby helped them remember an appointment or immunization they or their child needed.
  • 75.4% reported that a text4baby message informed them of medical warning signs they did not know.
  • 71.3% reported talking to their doctor about a topic that they read on a text4baby message.

Text4baby, an educational program of the National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition (HMHB), launched two years and has enrolled almost 300,000 subscribers and sent more than 28 million text messages. The program has more than 700 outreach partners including MTV, the White House Office of Science & Technology Policy, and more.

Learn more at www.text4baby.org. Follow the effort on Facebook and Twitter.

VIDEO: San Antonio Residents Urged to Find a Healthy Balance

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A new TV spot from SABalance.com, the City of San Antonio’s initiative to encourage healthy lifestyles, urges residents to “Find Your Balance” and develop good eating and exercise habits.

The bilingual spot prominently features active Latinos and beautiful San Antonio cityscapes.

Watch in English here or below:

Watch in Spanish here or below:

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