The Science of SaludToday

The Internet is crazy huge.

So, how can health communicators reach the right people with the right health messages?

At SaludToday, we’re all about using “digital content curation” to raise awareness of the particular health issues that disproportionately burden Latinos, as well as promote solutions and build people’s capacity to change these issues.

Check out our new scientific article that explains how we “curate.”

Curation is an emerging strategy that uses a systematic, refined process to create tailored health messages and prevent mixed messaging and information overload for an audience.

With massive amounts of content created across the Internet every minute, our digital health curation model and three-step approach—collect–craft–connect—identifies and brings our audience to targeted, relevant and engaging content that has the potential to affect people’s knowledge of Latino health issues, attention to health issues, and capacity to make healthy changes.

Be sure to follow our curation at the blog, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram.

“We at SaludToday work hard to highlight the latest real-life stories, research, and news on different aspects of Latino health, including cancer, obesity, and health equity,” said Dr. Amelie G. Ramirez, who founded the SaludToday campaign, which is based at the Institute for Health Promotion Research at the UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, and includes the Salud America! program to prevent Latino childhood obesity. “We want to help people understand Latino health issues and solutions, and empower people to drive healthy change.”

#SaludTues Tweetchat 2/16/16, 1pmET: “WHY Women’s Heart Health Matters!”

Heart disease is the #1 cause of death for Latina women in the U.S. with nearly 21,000 deaths occurring annually among Latino women

In fact, studies show Latina women are prone to developing heart disease 10 years earlier than non-Hispanic white women!

What can be done to prevent this?

Join our “WHY Women’s Heart Health Matters” #SaludTues Tweetchat on Tuesday, February 16, 2016 at 12pm CST (1 p.m. eastern) to learn more important facts about heart health. Share your resources, stories, and tips for preventing heart disease in the Latino community. The chat is co-hosted by Salud Today, The Heart Truth, and The Women’s Heart Alliance (a partnership of the Barbra Streisand Women’s Heart Center at Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute and the Ronald O. Perelman Heart Institute at the New York-Presbyterian Hospital /Weill Cornell Medical Center).

Follow the Tweetchat on Twitter (via @TheHeartTruth @FightLadyKiller  & @SaludToday) to get resources and examples of ways to improve women’s heart health.

We’ll open the floor to your stories and experiences as we explore:

  • Advice on how to bring the message of Women’s Heart Health to the forefront.
  • Ways to overcome disparities in heart disease for Latina women.
  • How involvement in clinical trials can help to improve heart health for women.
  • Stories and resources for promoting heart healthy communities.

Be sure to use the hashtag #SaludTues to follow the conversation on Twitter, share your stories and share resources that can help improve heart health in Latino communities.

Also, don’t miss our #Saludlive broadcast straight from #Periscope. Join the livestream to find out more about the Tweetchat.

#SaludTues is a weekly Tweetchat about Latino health at 12p CST/1p ET every Tuesday and hosted by @SaludToday, the Latino health social media campaign for the team at the Institute for Health Promotion Research (IHPR) at The UT Health Science Center at San Antonio. The IHPR is the team behind Salud America! The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Research Network to Prevent Latino Childhood Obesity, Exito! Latino Cancer Research Leadership Training Program, Quitxt and several other research projects!

Vaping Could Harm Unborn Babies

New data suggests using e-cigarettes during pregnancy may be as harmful as using tobacco products, DW reports.E-cigarette in woman's hand close up

Researchers at New York University Langone presented results from animal experiments that suggests that vaping while being pregnant may harm the fetus.

For the experiment, researchers exposed pregnant mice to e-cigarette vapors and compared them to pregnant mice that were not exposed to alternative tobacco products.

“The young animals [exposed] showed genetic changes in the cortex of the frontal lobe, the part of the brain responsible for cognition, planning and motivation,” according to Judy Zelikoff, toxicologist and lead researcher at NYU Langone

“Of course mice are not humans,” Zelikoff accepted. “These are only animal models. But if I was pregnant, I would definitely look at these data from animal experiments with respect.”

CONTEST: Salud Heroes vs. Sugar

4 Salud Heroes video playLatino kids get too much sugar, but not enough fruits and vegetables.

WATCH and VOTE for new Salud America! Salud Heroes who help fight sugar and push fruits/veggies by Feb. 29, 2016, and be entered in a random drawing to win a FREE T-shirt and jump rope!

Sugar Bites. County leaders built a toothy bilingual campaign to urge parents to choose water over sugary drinks for kids in Contra Costa, Calif.

Is Your Drink Sugar-Packed? Bexar County Judge Nelson Wolff and health advocates want folks to reevaluate their sugar intake in the San Antonio area.

Poets Fight the Fizz. Gabriel Cortez and other young minority poets joined with a health coalition to voice a counter-advertising campaign against sugary drinks in California.

Rx for Produce. A clinic teamed up with a farmers market to provide patients with fresh produce prescriptions to improve health in Forest Grove, Ore.

Growing Nutrition (and Biz). Students are learning farming, nutrition, culture and business skills at an innovative school garden at Bowie High School in El Paso, Texas.

Teaching Kids at the Market. Oregon farmers markets launched a club to teach kids who come to the markets about farming, fresh food, and healthy eating.

The #SaludHeroes with the most votes from Feb. 11-29, 2016, will get email and social media shout-outs from Salud America! by March 4, 2016.

Go here to vote, enter the random drawing, and see contest rules.

Salud America! is a Latino childhood obesity network funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and led by Dr. Amelie G. Ramirez of the Institute for Health Promotion Research at the UT Health Science Center at San Antonio. Salud America! runs a periodic video voting contest.

Study: Children with Step-Siblings Are More Likely to Be Aggressive

Children with step or half siblings are more likely to behave aggressively towards other children (over 30% of Latino children are in complex family situations), Latinos Health reports.

Researchers at the University of Michigan studied over 6,000 young children (under 5) and asked the biological mother of each child “about frequency of things such as temper tantrums, physical aggression, shows of anger, and destruction of personal property.”

The study concluded that when children live in complex family situations they tend to be 10% more aggressive towards other children than their peers who don’t’ live with half or step siblings.

“While this link does not establish causation, the findings add nuance to the prior scientific conversation on family and development, which focused on parental-union status, not siblings.”

 

Eva Rodriguez: An Èxito! Grad With a Passion for Latino Health

Editor’s Note: This is the story of a graduate of the 2015 Èxito! Latino Cancer Research Leadership Training program. Apply now for 2016.

Eva Rodriguez
New York City, New York

Rodriguez, Eva_003Like her lovely Mexican guanengo blouse, Eva isn’t afraid to “display” her cultural ties and her desire to help people wherever she goes.

That already includes a school health program and family planning program in New York, which built up her a desire to study reproductive health, reduce stigma, and start an open dialog in the Latino community.

We believe Eva has the capability of tackling Latino cancer health disparities and helping them with social services, youth development, and more.

“[Éxito!] made the idea of a DrPH more plausible,” said Eva.

#SaludTues Tweetchat 2/16/16: “Why Women’s Heart Health Matters!”

#SaludTues 0216 (1)Studies show Latinas are prone to developing heart disease 10 years earlier than non-Latina whites.

What can be done to prevent this?

Join our “Why Women’s Heart Health Matters” #SaludTues Tweetchat on at 12pm CST (1 p.m. EST) Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2016, to learn more important facts about heart health and share tips and stories for preventing heart disease in the Latino community.

The chat is hosted by Salud Today and co-hosted by The Heart Truth and The Women’s Heart Alliance (a partnership of the Barbra Streisand Women’s Heart Center at Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute and the Ronald O. Perelman Heart Institute at the New York-Presbyterian Hospital /Weill Cornell Medical Center).

We’ll open the floor to your stories and experiences as we explore:

  • Advice on how to bring the message of Women’s Heart Health to the forefront.
  • Ways to overcome disparities in heart disease for Latina women.
  • How involvement in clinical trials can help to improve heart health for women.
  • Stories and resources for promoting heart healthy communities.

Be sure to use the hashtag #SaludTues to follow the conversation on Twitter, share your stories and share resources that can help improve heart health in Latino communities.

Also, don’t miss our #Saludlive broadcast straight from #Periscope. Join the livestream to find out more about the Tweetchat.

#SaludTues is a weekly Tweetchat about Latino health at 12p CST/1p ET every Tuesday and hosted by @SaludToday, the Latino health social media campaign for the team at the Institute for Health Promotion Research (IHPR) at The UT Health Science Center at San Antonio. The IHPR is the team behind Salud America! The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Research Network to Prevent Latino Childhood Obesity, Exito! Latino Cancer Research Leadership Training Program, Quitxt and several other research projects!

Study Finds Latinos Have Lower Risk of Coronary Heart Disease

Latinos, Asians and African Americans have a lower risk of coronary heart disease than whites, according to a 10-year study of more than 1.3 million Kaiser Permanente members in Northern California.portrait smiling woman holding hugging herself with red heart above head

“Racial and ethnic differences in diabetes, cardiovascular-disease risk factors and their outcomes, especially in blacks, are well-documented, but population health estimates are often confounded by differences in access to high-quality health care,” said Jamal S. Rana, lead author of the study.

Rana adds “we were able to evaluate ethnic differences in risk of future coronary heart disease within a diverse population, which included not only black, but also large Asian and Latino populations, with uniform access to care in an integrated health care delivery system.”

The study concluded Latinos, Asians and Blacks with no prior history of coronary heart disease had lower risk, regardless of whether they had diabetes.

“Our findings are very encouraging. It is a complex issue, and further research is needed to address the differences in health status and outcomes related to race and ethnicity across the country,” Rana noted. “These findings may inform policy development and interventions designed to identify and eliminate racial and ethnic disparities.”

El ejercicio aumenta la sobrevivencia después de un ataque cardiaco

El ejercicio puede aumentar las posibilidades de supervivencia después de un ataque al corazón, un nuevo estudio realizado por un equipo de investigadores de John Henry Ford Health System, informa Latino Health.

“Nuestros datos sugieren que los médicos que trabajan con pacientes con factores de riesgo cardiovascular deberían decir,” señor Jones,  necesita  empezar un programa de ejercicios ahora para mejorar su condición física y posibilidad de supervivencia, si usted experimenta un ataque al corazón ‘ “, dice el doctor Clinton Brawner, fisiólogo de ejercicio clínico del Sistema de Salud Henry Ford. “Estos hallazgos sugieren que el aumento de la capacidad aeróbica antes de un ataque al corazón se asocia con una mejor supervivencia a corto plazo después del primer ataque al corazón.”

Los resultados del estudio, que se centró en 2,061 pacientes que sufrieron un ataque al corazón después de la prueba de esfuerzo, mostraron que los pacientes con altos niveles de aptitud eran un 40 por ciento menos propensos a morir “dentro de un año después de su primer ataque al corazón en comparación con los pacientes con menor aptitud “.

“Mientras que hasta el 50 por ciento de la aptitud puede estar basada en la genética, la actividad física es el único comportamiento que tenemos que puede mejorar la condición física”, dijo Brawner.

La falta de ejercicio representa un riesgo de muerte después de un ataque al corazón que es similar al riesgo de la diabetes, la hipertensión arterial y el tabaquismo, según los investigadores.

Latino Electorate is Younger and More Vibrant

A lot of political experts predict Latino voters will decide who will be the next president of the United States. In November 2016 Latino millennials (44%)  will account for nearly half of all Latino eligible voters projected for 2016, according to Pew Research Center.PH_Election-2016_Overview-Chart-01-1

Data shows the median age of the 35 million U.S. born Latinos is only 19. “Latino youth will be the main driver of growth among Latino eligible voters over the next two decades. Between 2012 and 2016, about 3.2 million young U.S.-citizen Latinos will have advanced to adulthood and become eligible to vote,” Pew Research said in a written statement.

According to Pew the number of eligible Latino voters has climbed from 5 percent in 1986 to 11.4 percent in 2016.

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